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Bite Statistics

Why The Texas Study on Mortality, Mauling & Maiming by Vicious Dogs Is Scientifically Unreliable

Delise Critiques Methodolgy
of Study and Conclusions

In April 2011, The Annals Of Surgery published the Texas based study Mortality, Mauling and Maiming by Vicious Dogs. The study detailed severe and fatal injuries and credited pit bulls as the culprits responsible for the injuries. It claimed the study examined the medical records of patients admitted to the level I trauma center in San Antonio University Hospital with dog bite injuries over a 15-year period.

 

The Stated Objective of the Study: Maiming and death due to dog bites are uncommon but preventable tragedies. We postulated that patients admitted to a level 1 trauma center with dog bites would have severe injuries and that the gravest injuries would be those caused by pit bulls.

Delise: Pit Bull Bites Are Not Identifiable
From Other Big Breed Dogs

Yet, according to fatal-dog-bite expert Karen Delise, it is impossible to look at injuries resulting from a dog attack and determine what breed or type of dog was involved. In fact, Delise says “If you’ve seen enough autopsy photos like I have, if what they are saying is true, that pit bulls inflict injuries unlike any other dogs well then you should be able to look at a photograph of a person that received a severe dog bite and tell me what breed did it. But you can’t. I mean I’ve seen hundreds of hundreds of photos and you can’t tell the difference from one breed or type of dog to another. If a dog intends to inflict a severe bite it’s going to inflict a severe bite.”

So how did non-animal experts Bini (MD), Cohn (MD), Acosta (RN, BSN), McFarland (RN, MS), Muir (MD), and Michalek (PhD) conclude that pit bulls are more capable of inflicting the gravest injuries?

Read more: Why The Texas Study on Mortality, Mauling & Maiming by Vicious Dogs Is Scientifically Unreliable